‘Show Me That My Father Is Alive.’ China Faces Torrent of Online Pleas.

Murat Harri Uyghur, a doctor in Finland, is helping to compile testimonies from other Uighurs in exile about loved ones who may be in Chinese internment camps.CreditMeeri Koutaniemi for The New York Times

The New York Times
Date: Feb. 17, 2019
By: Austin Ramzy

Murat Harri Uyghur, a doctor in Finland, is helping to compile testimonies from other Uighurs in exile about loved ones who may be in Chinese internment camps.CreditCreditMeeri Koutaniemi for The New York Times

HONG KONG — Many members of the Uighur ethnic group living in exile are worried that their relatives back home in China are locked up in internment camps — or dead.

So when China released a video this past week to prove that a prominent Uighur musician had not died in custody as rumored, Uighurs around the world sat up.

“Show me that my father is alive and well!” one wrote on Twitter. “Where are my relatives?” another asked. In one clip, a child held up a photo of her missing father, weeping as she said: “Show his video to us.”

Murat Harri Uyghur, a doctor living in Finland, and a group of fellow activists gave the campaign a hashtag, #MeTooUyghur(#MenmuUyghur in Uighur), and urged others to add their voices to it.    [FULL  STORY]

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