Opinion: China’s Long Game On Human Rights

NPR
Date: October 5, 2018
By: TED PICCONE

A Chinese man stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing’s Cangan Boulevard in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. China faced unprecedented criticism of its brutal repression of unarmed citizens demanding more freedoms. More recently, China has begun promoting its model of “socialism with Chinese characteristics” as the preferred path for advancing human rights.
Jeff Widener/AP

When it comes to the contentious arena of international human rights, China has arrived.

For decades, China’s Communist Party largely kept clear of muscling its way onto the global human rights stage, preferring to bide its time while it contended with massive economic and social challenges at home. This began to change in the wake of the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, when China faced unprecedented criticism of its brutal repression of unarmed citizens demanding more freedoms. Beijing fought hard to defend its one-party system and joined hands with like-minded autocratic states to block external criticism of its hard-line rule.

But it engaged in the international human rights system in other ways, including by ratifying a number of relevant treaties and inviting United Nations experts to visit the country and advise officials on compliance with international norms.    [FULL  STORY]

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