Faced With Barrage of Chinese Spies, US Expands Rules for National Security Cases

Epoch Times
May 3, 2016
By: Joshua Philipp

A U.S. Department of Justice seal is displayed on a podium during a news conference on Dec. 11, 2012, in Brooklyn, New York City. The Department of Justice recently expanded its definitions of national security cases in its U.S. Attorneys' Manual. (Ramin Talaie/Getty Images)
A U.S. Department of Justice seal is displayed on a podium during a news conference on Dec. 11, 2012, in Brooklyn, New York City. The Department of Justice recently expanded its definitions of national security cases in its U.S. Attorneys’ Manual. (Ramin Talaie/Getty Images)

Over the course of just three weeks in April, there were four cases involving Chinese espionage against the United States. And Facing this threat, the United States has broadened its rules for prosecuting cases that involve national security.

A letter from Deputy Attorney General Sally Q. Yates was allegedly circulated among federal prosecutors in March, which New York Times claimed to have obtained a copy of. The letter says, “All cases affecting national security, even tangentially, now require coordination and oversight in Washington.”

New York Times notes this “had always been the intention of the rule,” but the new update “made it explicit.” The letter also allegedly states, “The term ‘national security issue’ is meant to be a broad one.”

The piece doesn’t clarify what has actually been changed, but a closer look at the rules for these cases gives a much clearer picture.

A spokesperson from the Department of Justice told Epoch Times in an email that any official changes to the rules would appear in the U.S. Attorneys’ Manual—and the handbook does show two sections were updated in March 2016.     [FULL  STORY]

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