China’s Military Expansion Into Africa

The News Lens
By: Jeffrey Tsai

A man reads a board extolling China's contribution to the fight against Ebola, along a road in Monrovia November 15, 2014. China is dispatching health experts and medical staff to Liberia and Sierra Leone in response to U.N. calls for a greater global effort to fight the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa. REUTERS/James Giahyue (LIBERIA - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH DISASTER MILITARY) - RTR4E9LL
A man reads a board extolling China’s contribution to the fight against Ebola, along a road in Monrovia November 15, 2014. China is dispatching health experts and medical staff to Liberia and Sierra Leone in response to U.N. calls for a greater global effort to fight the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa. REUTERS/James Giahyue (LIBERIA – Tags: POLITICS HEALTH DISASTER MILITARY) – RTR4E9LL

Following its establishment of a logistics center in Djibouti, Africa, China has

expressed hopes to construct more military bases to “safeguard its national interests.”

One prime concern was piracy in the region; the Horn of Africa where Djibouti is located is seen as one of the major regions of piracy. China had been involved in anti-piracy operations in the region since 2008. With the creation of the logistics center, Colonel Wu Qian stated its mission to be “logistical support and personnel recuperation of the Chinese armed forces conducting such missions as maritime escort in the Gulf of Aden and waters off the Somali coast, peacekeeping and humanitarian assistance.”

This followed China’s increased participation on the international stage, such as expanding its UN peacekeeping force by 8,000 troops and the inauguration of a joint gasline project with Ethiopia, set to be completed by 2018.

Understanding that the move to build more military facilities would draw suspicion, China avoids describing its facility in Djibouti as a ‘military’ base, preferring to use the terms ‘support facilities’ or ‘logistical facilities’ instead. As work began on the logistics center in Djibouti, the Chinese foreign ministry confirmed its role to be purely logistical in nature, not power projection.

When asked about the initiative, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi says the move is “reasonable, logical and compatible with international norms.” He pointed out the tremendous number of Chinese businesses operating across the world and the concern to provide adequate security to its citizens; Chinese naval vessels had to evacuate hundreds of Chinese and foreigners from Yemen in April due to civil war.
It is important to note that Djibouti also has military bases established by the United States, France and Japan. China however seeks to not adhere to the “old method of expansionism” of constant infringement of sovereignty and power-politics that the West is historically associated with.     [FULL  STORY]

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